Lao Food Collection

Looking online for a local restaurant serving Lao food to invite friends and family to before I go.  Most establishments seem to offer combinations of Vietnamese-Thai-Lao-Burma.  Salivating now…  Here are some excerpts (+source links) from what I found:

1.  Minh Minh

minhminh photo2

Lao restaurant Richmond

https://www.zomato.com/melbourne/minh-minh-richmond

Google Map Directions

Mmmmm, yum – central, easy to get to, mostly good reviews, this is it!  … Stay tuned for review!

Minh Minh menu

https://www.zomato.com/melbourne/minh-minh-richmond/menu#

2.  LAOS  (foodie excerpt from Radio show transcript)

I don’t think I ate ANYTHING in Laos that I didn’t enjoy. The nicest surprise was the absence of oily, wet curries, and the much bigger emphasis on fresh, light, spicy salads or meat/seafood dishes; lashings of supremely fresh herbs, a huge array of vegetables, and a good variety of meats and fish.

Common dishes
Laap (Larb in Thailand): Minced chicken, pork, fish with onion, chilli, mint.
Papaya Salad – Always spicy, even when you ask for the mild version! Strips of green papaya, garlic, chili, peanuts, sugar, lime juice and more chili.
Pho – From Vietnam, that tasty broth with beef or pork, meatballs, thai basil, Sprouts, chilli – awesome for breakfast.

Sticky rice – that glutinous version served with almost every meal in Laos – be it salad, stirfry or soup. The idea is to take a couple of fingers full, roll it into a ball, and dip it into your dish to eat the two together.
My best meals in Laos:
Eggplant and fish with thai basil at Vilayvak restaurant in Vientiane – mushy and tangy and wonderful.
Breakfast Pork Pho at Kungs Café in a hidden little laneway in Vientiane.
Dried, fried beef with sesame seeds and spicy salsa at Spirit House by the Mekong River.

Where you can get it here:
YIM YAM – 12 Margaret Street Moonee Ponds   http://www.yimyam.com.au

A busy restaurant just off the buzzing Puckle Street, Yim Yam is an absolute gem. The highlight here is without a doubt the Yum – warm salads with bags of herbs, spices, vegies and texture.  The Goy Guy Chicken Salad is basically a laap, so a good one to try, but the stand out is the signature dish – Yum Yim Yam. Available with either Prawns or Tofu, it’s a dish full of strips of carrot, lettuce, red onion, spring onion, with toasted coconut and garlic and banana blossom. Absolute bliss.

Other good Laos staples to try include the spicy Laos sausage, Laos Beef Curry; and you can get sticky rice here. Importantly, Yim Yam offers unbelievable value for money, with most mains between $13 and $18. (Note: they have a sister restaurant in Ballarat Street Yarraville).

3.  Lao Food Blog

Lao food blog

 

http://www.foodfromnorthernlaos.com/

4. …National Dish of Laos – with live crabs!

Check out the complexities of preparing Laos food flavours – mmm, yum, I’d forgotten.

http://laosforums.com/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=229

 

 

#T1D : Diabetes+ is a persistent pain!

type 1 diabetes  link to info – diabetes australia
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Renza writes a chatty and informative blog about living with Type one Diabetes and this post entitled Confusion succinctly describes the tussle of living with vs suffering from this ‘condition/disease’.    During my young adult years, the only people with diabetes that I met (not many) seemed to be super heroes with their management, unlike me who felt as if I was constantly fighting a losing battle with blood sugar levels, and hence, a very bad diabetic who deserved every complication that would inevitably catch up with me.  Social networking and the internet has changed this – yes the good stories, and the bad stories, and every story in between is out there to share.  Finally I began to feel like I was no better or worse than others in the way I ‘managed my condition’ (there we go again with that language).

I was diagnosed close to 40 years ago and was ‘educated’ about what would happen if I didn’t control my blood sugar levels.  The big ones were always:

  • blindness (retinopathy)
  • kidney (renal) failure
  • neuropathy (leading to amputation of feet etc)

So I was most grateful to get to my age with full function of each of these things.  However, the shock was/is finding the number of other ‘conditions’ that those with diabetes just happen to be more susceptible to.  For me, these have included:

  • Hypothyroidism – Hashimotos (another autoimmune condition);
  • Tendon problems – including Carpal Tunnel, Trigger finger (stenosing tenosynovitis), and now months of shoulder pain;
  • Cysts that may become seriously infected – and the risk that any infection is slower to heal with diabetes (10 days in hospital and home visits for a week after that)
  • Retinopathy that has required painful laser treatments to prevent blindness
  • Pre-eclampsia necessitating 3 months in hospital before my son was born
  • As for ‘diabetes and mental health/depression‘, let’s not even go there.

This is not a ‘woe is me’ post, but I’m not sure I really want to hear the same refrain “Oh yes, it is common with diabetics” too much more.  Like today when I went to the opthamologist for my eyes and he tells me I must come back due to some changes that may indicate ‘neovascular glaucoma’:

The less-common neovascular glaucoma that tends to be associated with diabetes occurs when new, abnormal blood vessels grow on the iris, the colored part of the eye.

So there are times that I just don’t want to know any more.  I can get this information if I search for it (thank you internet) but today I just want to forget about it.  That ‘living with diabetes’ is persistent pain in the arse and all the effort put into managing it will never make up for all of those moments that could have been better spent on other things.

diabetes-on-the-brain