A #T1D Diabetic in Laos for a year

Diabetes is damned hard work and a persistent pain.  It can be hard enough moving to a new country, new language, new ways of understanding the world, and new food options, without the blood sugar levels (BSLs) going completely  and utterly crazy!

I managed to travel with no problems carrying a whole case of medications as hand luggage (+helmet, +laptop, +essentials).  The case was only checked once in Bangkok, by a very efficient airport official who checked through and opened some packets with her rubber gloved hands.  I had my explanatory letter ready and it really was no problem.

When I got to the hotel I filled the bar fridge with my insulin and other items needing refrigeration, and let the staff know not to turn the fridge power off.  Still living in (another) hotel I haven’t yet been able to properly unpack and consolidate my supplies so I still don’t really know what I’ll run out of – but as per my earlier post #T1D diabetic supplies for a year  I know I will.

So my blood sugar levels and insulin requirements have plummeted since arrival.  I try to surmise why this might be, and whether it is transient, or more longer term.  Some possible reasons:

  • Constant state of excitement and joy!
  • Low level but constant underlying stress
  • The heat and humidity
  • Food – eating less, and changes in diet
  • Beer Lao – insulin replacement therapy?
  • (Slightly) more exercise, exertion

Really though, it could be anything!  Hormones?  Body trying to cure itself?  …

So being on an insulin pump, where I have a constant set basal level of short acting insulin, onto which I would bolus a dose if I eat carbohydrates, or to correct a higher bsl, I have already lowered my basal (24hr dose) from 20 to 17 units of humalog, and hardly bolused at all, even when I do eat, because my bsl is already too low.

To cut a long story short, I need to constantly monitor my bsl using my meter and my precious supply of blood testing strips – of which I was only permitted to order 11 boxes from NDSS when I left Australia.  So the saga continues and I’m still pissed off about it – that my short and long term control over my health is hampered by my own country’s medical system that would not allow or assist me to get the supplies I needed before I left.  Again, still a work in progress … T1D and its persistent struggles …

 

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Annabelle Leve

I'm a techno-novice, but determined to learn! I want to share my stories, and create a space of my own for this purpose. As life changes, I take myself with me.

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